Cate Blanchett and the modern day Luddites

If the scientists have the future in their bones, then the traditional culture responds by wishing the future did not exist.     CP SNOW

Cate Blanchett made her self satisfied, self promoting oration at the ABC/ALP funeral extravaganza only a few weeks ago, where on the television screen I swear her nose grew a few centimetres, explaining the extraordinary benefits she had gained by all the free university education she had received through the Whitlam Government — aka Australian taxpayer — largesse.

On its heels comes another triumphant self-justificatory explanation of the value of an Arts Degree for our national future, nay, the future of humanity, this time delivered at the North Ryde’s Macquarie University Faculty of Arts.

Tim Blair covers the travesty brilliantly:

Blanchett said: “I’d like to posit today that it is the arts that have always been the driver for innovation and exploration. I chose these words precisely because they are always credited to science.”
Quite right. What do scientists know about exploration? We all remember arts graduate Neil Armstrong’s thrilling dissertation on lunar inequality and post-modernism during his landmark 1969 moon tutorial.

You get the drift. It reminds of my rediscovery only a few years ago of CP Snow’s “The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution” that I had studied along with so many others in the early 60’s at school.

I very quickly realised in this quote that Snow was talking about the self-indugent narcisistic dreamers of the Left, the culture that disregards and distains wealth creation and industry, a culture with a total ignorance of economics and a culture made up of preachy environmentalists that basically have little understanding of science.

Snow understood the difference between the Arts and Science; the moralising and the creating; the seeming and the doing.

“Most of our fellow human beings, for instance, are underfed and die before their time. In the crudest terms, that is the social condition. There is a moral trap which comes through the insight into man’s loneliness: it tempts one to sit back, complacent in one’s unique tragedy, and let the others go without a meal . . . As a group, the scientists fall into that trap less than others. . . . If the scientists have the future in their bones, then the traditional culture responds by wishing the future did not exist. It is the traditional culture, to an extent remarkably little diminished by the emergence of the scientific one, which manages the Western world . . . It can be said simply, and it is this. If we forget the scientific culture, then the rest of Western intellectuals have never tried, wanted, or been able to understand the industrial revolution, much less accept it. Intellectuals, in particular literary intellectuals, are natural Luddites. . . For, of course, one truth is straightforward. Industrialisation is the only hope of the poor.”

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